Prompt: Write About a Greek God or Goddess

Brainstorming ideas: 1. Pick a God or Goddess For example: Hades: Olympian God of the Underworld Hera: Olympian Queen of the Gods, Goddess of Marriage & Birth Athena: Olympian Goddess of Wisdom & War 2. What powers do they hold? Hades: Has the ability to become invisible. Hera: Can bless or curse a marriage. Athena:Continue reading “Prompt: Write About a Greek God or Goddess”

Shut Up, Hera by Elle Vue

Luminous highlighter glosses my perky cheeks Buttermilk ribbons tangle in my honey-coated hair Is it strawberries or wine that smear across my lips? I’d do anything to feel satin suffocating my hips. Loose curls and apple blossom hairspray, Neck perfumed with honeysuckles di primavera, My eyes flash of amber fires from an astron’s core BreatheContinue reading “Shut Up, Hera by Elle Vue”

How to: Show Instead of Tell

By Elle Vue What is “Show Don’t Tell?” When workshopping poetry everyone always screams, “show us, don’t tell us!” But what does this mean? I feel like I’m already showing. How do I put my abstract ideas into concrete sentences? “Show don’t tell” does not necessarily mean one should add more adjectives to frame theContinue reading “How to: Show Instead of Tell”

To Dust You Shall Return, In Dust You Shall Learn by Elle Vue

     Perfumed sap infiltrates my nostrils with dusty tales told by antiqued myrrh, of worlds unseen and wisdom never reached quite in the nick of human time. As I walk deeper into the coated forest, the red, Mississippi mud begins to cake my once tender feet.     Whisper secrets to me through theContinue reading “To Dust You Shall Return, In Dust You Shall Learn by Elle Vue”

Revising Poetry: Syntax, Diction, and Play

by Elle Vue How To: Mechanically: 1. Look at the syntax in your poem– the arrangement of your words and phrases. Syntax includes much more than just grammar, it helps provide rhythm, structure, and tone in the poem. ◆ Is the meaning of each sentence clear? This may seem like an obvious mistake to lookContinue reading “Revising Poetry: Syntax, Diction, and Play”